The Future

First off, this is a huge topic with endless answers. Although I agree with A.J. Juliani (and Elon Musk) that these types of changes need to be thought through using first principles thinking rather than analogous thinking, I’m going to start with the latter first.

Photo courtesy of Scott Swigart via Flickr
Photo courtesy of Scott Swigart via Flickr

What I wish I had had, and what I want for my own kids, is for education to take shape around them in response to their strengths, rather than them having to adjust and fit into the mold of traditional education, perhaps denying what it is they are good at in order to work on what the system thinks is important. I know lots of teachers, who became teachers, because as kids they felt school wasn’t relevant to them or even that they weren’t smart enough to be successful at anything else. The things I could have done if I had known what I know about myself now!

Photo courtesy of Kit Keat via Flickr
Photo courtesy of Kit Keat via Flickr

Yong Zhao says each child is a Rudolf. Unique individuals, with unique strengths, just waiting for the right opportunity to develop it. If a new situation (fog) had never come along, the other reindeers wouldn’t have realized that Rudolf’s big, red nose was a gift and not a burden. Our students need exposure to authentic problems, collaborative situations, and life beyond the classroom so that they too can realize how important it is to develop their strengths and contribute with their passion.

Sir Ken Robinson says there are two kinds of people in the world: those that endure what they do, and those that what they do, is who they are. But what if school is so narrow, that many kids never stumble upon their passion? Robinson explains that for many, school dislocates people from their natural talents, and that like Rudolf, we must create circumstances where they show up.

I suppose to figure out where to go in education, we must agree on the purpose of education? While I could cite tons of resources about the many different perspectives on this question, I’ll bring it back to my kids. The reasons I want my kids to get an education is to prepare them to be successful in the future. This education includes skills and knowledge to get a job, how to work with people in said job(s), and how to learn in order to develop their passions or tackle a new challenge.

Also, for my own kids, I would have no problems with them not learning to read until 1st or 2nd grade if instead of literacy cramming, there was more room to maintain their natural curiosity and love of learning, while developing their inquiry and problem solving skills.

Peruse the article 110 predictions for the next 110 years  and the video that A.J. Juliani says “changed his perspective on what his job was as a teacher,” and see if you can stop your head from spinning. The world will be a much different place for our children.

To wrap this up, I’ll try to bring these ramblings back ‘down to earth’ and into the classroom. I think that what we need now to head for the future is to put learning into the students’ hands. We need to spark our children’s curiosity and their need for learning with student centered, real-world-applicable teaching methods. Taking learning beyond the classroom, using gaming, introducing kids to the world of MOOCs, and connecting students to others students and professionals around the globe are just a few strategies that will help make students into learners.

Side Note: Be on the look out for A.J.’s upcoming blog posts on Why We Learn (and how it is changing), How We Learn (and why it is changing), and Our Future and The Purpose of Schooling.

 

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